Always New Mistakes

December 7, 2007

Life after the 2.0 bubble

Filed under: Blogs, Business — Tags: , , , , — Alex Barrera @ 4:23 pm

Many people are talking about the current technology bubble we are experiencing. It’s something that has been written about in many places. It has even been depicted in the following video (if you haven’t seen it yet, it’s a must):

I don’t want to argue about it, as there has been quite some fuzz around it. What it’s clear to me is that it will eventually burst. When that happens many startups will have to close and many people will lost their jobs. Will it be worst than in 1999? I can’t know, although I personally think it won’t be as dreadful. Anyway, I was wondering what will be the future of the blogosphere when this bubble crashes?. It’s easy to predict that many startups will have to close due to poor or inexistent users, but what will happen to all the tech blogs out there? Brian Oberkirch has an interesting post about the value of most of the current tech blogs. Many of them just reproduce the latest news but with different words. I think we need those kind of blogs, but right now we have way too much like them. We are needing valuable bloggers that, as Brian points, should create hidden relationships between things, and that make us think and analyze current trends. So I wonder, if the bubble bursts, what will happen with all those new-shinny-startup-review-copycats? Will many of us will still be there? If there are no more tech companies, will people stop blogging or they’ll just blog about the bubble’s crash?

Take the example of TechCrunch, if there are no more startups, will they have to blog about other stories? Will the readers continue to read those new stories or will they move on? I guess my point is, should we expect a huge drop in our blog audiences after the bubble bursts? Or even better, will the overall number of posts per day decrease?

Personally I would expect the same level of blog posts, but instead of talking about new companies, they could post detailed analysis about why the startup X or company Y failed. Or for example, about how the companies that did manage to stay alive made it through the crash, what strategies they adopted and lessons learned. Nevertheless, some tech blogs will inevitably disappear or at least lower (a lot) their post rates speeds.

As a blogger or a blog reader, do you think we might be heading to a blog crisis? If not, do you foresee any situation that would eventually lead to a blog crisis?

PS: Sorry about the delay in posting. I’ve had some really stressful weeks, but I’m back with some new posts.

UPDATE: I had to change the url of the video as it had changed. It’s working again 🙂

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